Early Childhood Caries: What Is It and How to Prevent It?

Posted by & filed under Infant Oral Care, Infant Teeth, Oral Health, Preventative Care.

If only a Snickers bar or a Coke a day kept cavities away, America’s kids would be living in sweets heaven.

Alas, Snickers bars and good childhood oral health don’t work that way. Today more than ever, America’s children are at risk for developing serious oral health problems due to poor oral hygiene practices. And no one, not even newborns to toddlers, are safe from oral health dangers.

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Simple Mistakes that Cause Millions of Preventable Cavities

Posted by & filed under Cavity Prevention, Infant Oral Care, Pediatric Dentistry.

No parent wants their child to have cavities and the majority of us take special care to ensure that each dental visit ends cavity-free.  Yet, tooth decay remains the most common preventable childhood disease in the U.S. Here are a few simple mistakes that, if corrected, could save children from millions of cavities.

  1. Not Starting Prevention Early Enough

Many parents wait until children are almost school-age before setting the first dental appointment and before they begin focusing on good oral habits.  However, oral care should truly begin before primary teeth even appear.  For example, parents can use a soft, damp cloth to clean their baby’s gums after each feeding.  Scheduling the first dental appointment should also take place when the first tooth appears or before the age of one, whichever comes first.  Finding a dental home early in your child’s life is one of the most important preventative measures you can take for your child’s oral future.

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Baby Teeth Are Temporary, So Are They Really Important?

Posted by & filed under Baby Teeth, Cavity Prevention, Infant Oral Care, Primary Teeth.

We often hear people downplay the importance of primary teeth (also called “baby” or “milk” teeth).  The front 4 primary teeth generally last until 6-7 years of age, while the back teeth (cuspids and molars) aren’t replaced until age 10-13.  People mistakenly believe that since these teeth are temporary, that they do not matter in the long run.  This will often lead to the neglect of primary teeth and can cause permanent damage.

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Your Infant’s Teeth: When Should Care Begin?

Posted by & filed under Infant Oral Care, Pediatric Dentistry.

Establishing a healthy starting point for your child’s oral care start earlier than you may realize.  It’s amazing how quickly time passes and how fast children grow up.  We’ve put together a few guidelines to encourage you to make good dental habits a priority and to begin caring for your child’s teeth as soon as possible.

Start before teeth arrive.

First teeth generally appear around 6 months. (Don’t worry if your child is sooner or later than this.  All children are different.) Gently wiping the inside of your baby’s mouth with a soft cloth after meals or during bath time will help to reduce bacteria and give emerging teeth a great start.  It will also get you in the habit of caring for your child’s teeth until they are ready to take over themselves.

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Since Baby Teeth Are Temporary, Are They Important?

Posted by & filed under Baby Teeth, Infant Oral Care, Oral Care.

We often hear people downplay the importance of primary teeth (also called “baby” or “milk” teeth).  The front 4 primary teeth generally last until 6-7 years of age, while the back teeth (cuspids and molars) aren’t replaced until age 10-13.  People mistakenly believe that since these teeth are temporary, that they do not matter in the long run.  This will often lead to the neglect of primary teeth and can cause permanent damage.

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