How to Treat Your Child’s First Toothache

Posted by & filed under Dental Tips, Flossing, Pediatric Dentistry.

For parents, there’s no greater pain than seeing your children in pain. And your child’s first toothache can be particularly distressing for parents searching for the best way to alleviate their child’s throbbing discomfort.

Toothaches have a variety of root causes. Most often, they are the result of a cavity. In some cases, a tooth may be broken. Still in other cases, the cause can be nothing more than a piece of food that has become wedged between teeth. But toothaches aren’t something you can expect to heal themselves or a matter the Tooth Fairy can take care of.

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Simple Mistakes that Cause Millions of Preventable Cavities

Posted by & filed under Cavity Prevention, Infant Oral Care, Pediatric Dentistry.

No parent wants their child to have cavities and the majority of us take special care to ensure that each dental visit ends cavity-free.  Yet, tooth decay remains the most common preventable childhood disease in the U.S. Here are a few simple mistakes that, if corrected, could save children from millions of cavities.

  1. Not Starting Prevention Early Enough

Many parents wait until children are almost school-age before setting the first dental appointment and before they begin focusing on good oral habits.  However, oral care should truly begin before primary teeth even appear.  For example, parents can use a soft, damp cloth to clean their baby’s gums after each feeding.  Scheduling the first dental appointment should also take place when the first tooth appears or before the age of one, whichever comes first.  Finding a dental home early in your child’s life is one of the most important preventative measures you can take for your child’s oral future.

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The Dentist: Boogeyman or Friend?

Posted by & filed under Baby Teeth, Brushing, Cavity Prevention, Dental Care, Dental Tips, Pediatric Dentistry, Uncategorized.

Many kids would rather face the boogeyman or the monster under the bed than take on the scary person with the drill known as their family dentist.

For some, dental phobia is a terrifying, paralyzing fear of dentistry or receiving dental care. And no one is more spooked than the thought of seeing a dentist than kids.

It is perfectly normal for children to be fearful of dentists. As in many childhood firsts, it is the fear of the unknown. Small children often think going to the dentist will hurt, because they don’t know what to expect. And any outside influences that stress the pain associated with visiting the dentist can only compound kids’ fears of seeing someone who is actually their best friend in fighting cavities and taking care of their teeth.

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Kids’ Cavity-Safe Plan

Posted by & filed under Brushing, Cavities, Cavity Prevention, Dental Care, Dental Tips, Flossing, Oral Care, Oral Health, Oral Hygiene, Pediatric Dentistry.

Cavity prevention ranks right up there with homework and taking out the garbage among kids’ favorite topics to discuss. Heck, some kids may rather go to bed early than talk to their parents about what they’re doing to keep their teeth healthy.

But knowing how to eat healthy and practice good teeth hygiene is essential to kids’ overall oral and physical health. Because tooth decay, cavities and root canals are three of the least fun words in the English language, kids must know how they can avoid painful cavities and extra dentist visits through simple, easy – and dare we say fun – dental health steps.

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Your Infant’s Teeth: When Should Care Begin?

Posted by & filed under Infant Oral Care, Pediatric Dentistry.

Establishing a healthy starting point for your child’s oral care start earlier than you may realize.  It’s amazing how quickly time passes and how fast children grow up.  We’ve put together a few guidelines to encourage you to make good dental habits a priority and to begin caring for your child’s teeth as soon as possible.

Start before teeth arrive.

First teeth generally appear around 6 months. (Don’t worry if your child is sooner or later than this.  All children are different.) Gently wiping the inside of your baby’s mouth with a soft cloth after meals or during bath time will help to reduce bacteria and give emerging teeth a great start.  It will also get you in the habit of caring for your child’s teeth until they are ready to take over themselves.

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